Hydrology Corner Blog: North American Stream Hydrographers

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Stream Velocity Rod – The Low-Cost, Low-Tech Tool That You Need in Your Field Truck

There are several highly sophisticated technologies available for measuring streamflow. However, no amount of electronic wizardry will guarantee that you come home with a good discharge measurement. There are many things that can wrong such as with the electrical power or electronic communication between the system components. In the event as an electronic failure you are screwed because these devices are so expensive that no one can afford to carry a spare.

More Water Resource Extremes? The New Normal Doesn’t Look Like Your Old Average Anymore

The theme of the Canadian Water Resources Association (CWRA) 2015 conference in Winnipeg this year was “More Extremes? Preparing for future challenges to Canada’s water resources.” Fittingly, the North American Stream Hydrographers (NASH) held 3 sessions that were dominated by discussions of how to resolve several of the daunting challenges inherent in measuring water. All…

Closing the Gap: Hydrological Science and Practice

The NASH symposium this year was held at the joint CWRA/CGU national convention in Banff, Alberta. This was the first joint convention between the Canadian Geophysical Union – the home of Canadian research hydrologists – and Canadian Water Resources Association – the home of Canadian water resources engineering practitioners. There has always been a big…

Hydrometric Workforce - hydrology corner blog

Do you have enough bananas?

The rejuvenation of the hydrometric workforce is apparent everywhere I look. The bi-modal demographic of pre-retirees and new recruits is rapidly changing to a positive-skew, long tail, age distribution. This is both exciting and worrisome. The long tail of experienced veterans is continually getting shorter. What is left is a cadre of (mostly) young, very…

North American Stream Hydrographers

Measuring and monitoring streamflow is a place-based activity. Hydrographers are isolated from each other because of the size of the geographic domain each one can cover. Training opportunities and technology workshops are often organized along institutional lines. Hydrographers often have closer communication with distant colleagues in the same institution than they have with those operating…