Graphic of water processes and policies for YVR.

We usually report water quantity information as a volumetric rate (e.g. m3/s); we usually report water quality information as a concentration (e.g. mg/l); and we usually report precipitation as a length (e.g. mm). But we don’t have to. The mass of water is related to its volume by its density which, conveniently, can be assumed to be unity (1). This means that we could just...

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Two people on overpacked bikes.

There is more data to deal with than there used to be. However, dealing with it may require a different approach than simply working harder with the same tools. The new “Global Hydrological Monitoring Industry Trends” report confirms the rapid international adoption of continuous monitoring technologies. One of the questions asked of over 700 respondents representing monitoring agencies from around the world was: “Are the primary technologies used...

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Data communication tech changes graphic.

Results from the 2012 Report - Global Hydrological Monitoring Industry Trends published by Aquatic Informatics Inc. The first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) was launched in October 1975. The GOES launch initiated a sequence of events leading to a major re-design of hydrometric programs throughout North America. The relatively cheap and reliable data communication provided by GOES provided an immediate benefit for hydrometric operators: to monitor station...

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Trends in the hydrological monitoring industry.

Aquatic Informatics’ global survey of over 700 water professionals in 90 countries puts a spotlight on an industry undergoing rapid change. Key trends include significant growth in network size, modernization of monitoring technology, and an increasing demand for comprehensive data management systems. After months of refining survey questions, collecting responses, and analyzing the results, the new report Global Hydrological Monitoring Industry Trends has been released. I...

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