An image with data quality and Water Quality bookends holding books.

Laboratory analysis of a water quality sample links a lot of data to a singular point in time and space. However, the objectives for monitoring may span scales from point (e.g. at an outfall) to watershed (e.g. to characterize waters; identify trends; assess threats; inform pollution control; guide environmental emergency response; and support the development, implementation, and assessment of policies and regulations)....

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A salamander being measured. It is an endangered species.

In the United States, the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) defines endangered species as “any species which is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range… “ and critical habitat as “the specific areas within the geographical area occupied by the species … on which are found those physical or biological features (I) essential to the conservation of the...

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An illustration of watershed scale outcomes.

Laboratory analysis of a water quality sample links a lot of data and metadata to a singular point in time and space. However, the objectives for monitoring may span spatial and temporal scales from point sampling (e.g. at an outfall) to watershed assessment (e.g. to characterize waters; identify trends; assess threats; inform pollution control; guide environmental emergency response; and support the development, implementation, and assessment...

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GLOS Data Challenge.

The Great Lakes hold 21% of the world's fresh surface water by volume. Only the right information today can ensure the sustainable use of these waters for generations to come. In North America, the Great Lakes account for 84 percent of fresh surface water. Today, these lakes are sourced for drinking water for over 40 million people. One and a half million U.S. jobs and...

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Graphic of water processes and policies for YVR.

We usually report water quantity information as a volumetric rate (e.g. m3/s); we usually report water quality information as a concentration (e.g. mg/l); and we usually report precipitation as a length (e.g. mm). But we don’t have to. The mass of water is related to its volume by its density which, conveniently, can be assumed to be unity (1). This means that we could just...

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