Monkey eating a banana.

The rejuvenation of the hydrometric workforce is apparent everywhere I look. The bi-modal demographic of pre-retirees and new recruits is rapidly changing to a positive-skew, long tail, age distribution. This is both exciting and worrisome. The long tail of experienced veterans is continually getting shorter. What is left is a cadre of (mostly) young, very smart, capable, well-educated and enthusiastic stream hydrographers. This transition is very timely...

Read More
An aquaduct.

Aqueducts are to natural streams what wheat fields are to tall grass prairies. There is an undeniable elegance in form that comes from simplification of function to unity. Whereas any pristine stream serves many ecological, geomorphic, social, spiritual and economic functions, an aqueduct exists for the sole function of moving water from one place to another. Nature - left on its own - is dynamic, unpredictable and...

Read More
Horseshoe bend in the Colorado River.

Every river has a story to tell. We don’t often understand the story because it is told in terms of quaternary geology, climatology, hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, aquatic and riparian ecology, and basic chemistry and physics. This horseshoe bend in the Colorado River is telling a story of the battle of the ages between the force of gravity against the force of continental drift. At any given point...

Read More
"Rivers Forming" graphic from National Geographic.

I came across this aerial photo by National Geographic and was compelled to post on the hydrology of how such a stunning river would develop. Dendritic drainage structures originate from sheet flow – downslope movement of water as a thin sheet – which converges or diverges on an uneven surface. Where convergence occurs the water develops more power (mass x velocity), which mobilizes sediments. This erosion...

Read More
"Cyberinfrastructure" graphic.

I attended 62nd OGC Technical Committee meeting in Boulder, Colorado with my colleague Stuart Hamilton in September. As most of you probably know, the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is an international industry consortium of 438 companies, government agencies and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards for geospatial data exchange protocol and web services. OGC standards are technical documents that detail...

Read More

Click here to read Part 1 - background about measurement accuracy and error, definitions and more This series of discussions are to first give you a scientific picture of hydrological measurement errors and then open the interesting discussion of how to automatically detect, validate and correct erroneous sensor data given the observations from Data Acquisition System (DAS) and field visit information. Let’s now have a closer look...

Read More