Trends in the hydrological monitoring industry.

Aquatic Informatics’ global survey of over 700 water professionals in 90 countries puts a spotlight on an industry undergoing rapid change. Key trends include significant growth in network size, modernization of monitoring technology, and an increasing demand for comprehensive data management systems. After months of refining survey questions, collecting responses, and analyzing the results, the new report Global Hydrological Monitoring Industry Trends has been released. I...

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Aquatic Informatics logo on grey map of the USA.

After a very lengthy and rigorous process the USGS has selected AQUARIUS as the platform for replacement of its aging Automated Data Processing System (ADAPS). Obviously, this is very good news for Aquatic Informatics, but I would like to speak to why I believe the decision of the USGS to choose a commercial solution, rather than re-build in-house, is very good news for global hydrometry. It...

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A photo of Ed Quilty, President & CEO – Aquatic Informatics and Robert Mason, Acting Chief – US Geological Survey (USGS).

Ed Quilty, President & CEO - Aquatic Informatics and Robert Mason, Acting Chief - US Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Surface Water at the USGS National Data Conference in Portland, Oregon I’m writing this blog from the USGS National Data Conference in Portland, Oregon, where yesterday the USGS announced that AQUARIUS has been selected as the commercial replacement for the existing Automated Data Processing System (ADAPS),  the core software...

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Yellow ruler.

I was asked the other day if I thought that the USGS would ever go metric. I am unqualified to answer this question but I care about the implications of the issue. I started my field career working in Imperial units (also known as English) before the Water Survey of Canada converted to the International System of units (SI, commonly known as metric) in 1980 so...

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A hydrographer working on a river in the wintertime.

Measuring and monitoring streamflow is a place-based activity. Hydrographers are isolated from each other because of the size of the geographic domain each one can cover. Training opportunities and technology workshops are often organized along institutional lines. Hydrographers often have closer communication with distant colleagues in the same institution than they have with those operating gauges close to home who work for other agencies. However, there...

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