Hydrology Corner Blog: conferences

water infrastructure environment conference

Adventures of a Peripatetic Hydrologist – Water Infrastructure & the Environment Conference

Ray Maynard calls me a peripatetic hydrologist. I had to look it up. There are two meanings: 1) a person who travels from place to place or 2) an Aristotelian philosopher. I think I fit both definitions. Aristotle placed great emphasis on direct observation of nature and that theory must follow fact. I also travel a lot. Whereas I can’t deny this label, I have to wonder if it was meant as a compliment. After all, hydrology is a place-based, observational, science. How can I be a real hydrologist if I am traveling all the time, and hence, not occupied with making direct observations at a place?

international hydrometry workshop

International Hydrometry Workshop – Recent Advances in Technology & Uncertainty Analysis

In the field of hydrometry there is benefit that arises from global collaboration. Few monitoring agencies have enough resources needed to invest in wide-ranging discovery of better ways for acquiring and producing streamflow data. However, it is feasible for local centres of expertise to develop that can advance any one of many opportunities for significant advancement in the business of water measurement and monitoring.

Water Funding Amusement

Reflections on Water & Amusement – What We’re Willing to Pay For

On my way home from the AWRA conference in Orlando I sat next to a fellow on his way home from the IAAPA Expo (International Association of Amusement Parks & Attractions), which had taken place at the Orange County Conference Centre the same week. Even though he slept for most of the 7 hours we sat next to each other, I did learn a thing or two while he was awake. There were 35,000 people at the amusement park convention and the expo was so large that the distance to walk around all of the vendor booths was 9 miles! It is hard for me to grasp the scale and the meaning of this. There were, perhaps, 500 water professionals who could afford the time and money to come to the AWRA, a significant turnout for water professionals in North America.

AWRA Conference 2016

AWRA Conference 2016 – Improving Water Resilience & Water Monitoring Data

The sessions and presentations at AWRA conference in Orlando Florida reinforced many observations I have been making about the water sector. Long gone are the days when the conference was dominated by the stereotype engineer with pocket protectors and a slide rule. There are no sessions on nuances of flood frequency analysis or the shear stress of rip rap. There is obviously still a need for water data for conventional engineering purposes but this need has been overwhelmed by a new reality. The application of water science is changing.

AHA Conference 2016 - Water Data Management & Technology

AHA Conference 2016 – Technology & Better Water Resources Management

Stream hydrographers from all around Oceania gather for the biennial Australia Hydrographers Association Conference, which was held this year in Canberra, the capital of Australia. Water monitoring is a place-based activity meaning that hydrographers are widely dispersed all across the landscape with very little opportunity to interact, build community, share experiences, and develop best practices.

sensor-observations-environmental-decisions_hydrology-corner-blog

Sensible Sense-Making From Sensor Observations for Sensitive Environmental Decisions

The theme of the CWRA 2016 conference in Montreal was “Water Management at all Scales: Reducing Vulnerability and Increasing Resilience”. Three days of presentations related to this theme got me thinking about what we need to be doing better in order to be better custodians of damaged, threatened and pristine water systems. We are the inheritors of a legacy of misguided decisions that have left many water sources (e.g. hillslopes, springs, wetlands), waterways, and sinks (e.g. oceans and deep aquifers) in an unhealthy state.

International Rating Curve Standards

Rating Curves Workshop – International Best Practices Explored in New Zealand

Stage-discharge rating curves define a unique relation between water level and discharge, enabling continuous derivation of streamflow from water level record. This is important because water level (which is relatively easy to monitor) is only locally relevant whereas discharge (which is relatively difficult to measure directly) is the integral of all runoff processes upstream of the gauge. The vast majority of all streamflow data that has ever been produced is a derived result of a rating curve. In other words, almost everything that we know (or rather that we think we know) about hydrology is a result of rating curves.

EBJ Business Award

Outlook – Environmental Industry to Continue to Outpace US GDP 2:1

Last week I attended the Environmental Industry Summit XIV in San Diego, California where Grant Ferrier, President and CEO of Environmental Business International Inc., presented EBI’s annual overview of market performance, segment trends and an outlook for 2016 and beyond. The Summit is a great event that brings together industry leaders to network and discuss opportunities for all of us working in the environmental space. The results for 2015 and the outlook for 2016 are very exciting.