Stu Hamilton
Stu Hamilton

Senior Hydrologist

Hydrology field work done today, if managed well, becomes part of a legacy of information that will serve for generations to come. As an avid canoeist and whitewater kayaker I was easily drawn into a career in hydrometry in spite of an undergraduate education in biology. Shortly after graduating from the University of Alaska I started work with the Water Survey of Canada in Whitehorse, Yukon. The initial appeal was the freedom to travel extensively to some of the most beautiful landscapes on the planet to measure streamflow. The highlight of my career was measuring 7040 m3s-1 of flow on the Porcupine River using a small, under-powered, aluminum skiff, kevlar tagline and a 150 pound sounding weight. It took 4 tries to string the line, while uprooted trees and large ice floes came down the river. I am guilty of being a data philosopher. I think we have to first be able to clearly articulate what an ideal data set should look like and then we can influence the direction of technological development to make that ideal achievable.

A Question of Scale – Reconciling Information Density with Information Scarcity

Laboratory analysis of a water quality sample links a lot of data to a singular point in time and space. However, the objectives for monitoring may span scales from point (e.g. at an outfall) to watershed (e.g. to characterize waters; identify trends; assess threats; inform pollution control; guide environmental emergency response; and support the development, implementation, and assessment of policies and regulations).

The Value of Uncertain Data

Evidence-based decision-making is a useful framework for the development of policies and practices to ensure water security, ecosystem resilience, and productive societies. The term “evidence-based” is gradually yielding to the term “data-driven” as focus shifts from specified data (i.e. fit-for purpose) to data discovery (i.e. big data) as the source of evidence.

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Strategic Recommendations for Water Monitoring for the Next 25 Years

A new report, “Future Water Priorities for the Nation: Directions for the U.S. Geological Survey Water Mission Area,” speaks to water science and resources challenges for the next 25 years. While written specifically for the Water Mission Area (WMA) for the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the driving forces for change are applicable to any region of the world.

Water Data Management in Africa

Sustainable Water Data Management in Africa

The African continent is characterized by diverse geographic features, climates, and cultures but a common denominator is that African nations are working hard to improve social stability, economic security, public health, and environmental sustainability. Solutions emerging from various political adventures seem to be evolving toward a mix of governance approaches sourced from the west (based on an ideal of democratic capitalism) and those sourced from the east (based on an ideal of progressive socialism).

Reality by the Numbers – What the Spreadsheet Has Done to Us

There is a hidden cost behind the reliance on spreadsheets that is invisible to those who are dependent on them. Most people use spreadsheets for multiple purposes, so using spreadsheets to manage water data seems “free” relative to the cost of purpose-built software for data management. A National Public Radio Podcast about spreadsheets was recommended to me by colleagues at the CWRA conference in Lethbridge last week.