Brian Gouge
Brian Gouge

B.Eng, Ph.D, Research Scientist

Brian Gouge is a Research Scientist at Aquatic Informatics and an Adjunct Professor in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Victoria and a PhD in Resource Management and Environmental Studies from the University of British Columbia. His career has spanned his interests in both technology and the environment. Prior to joining Aquatic Informatics, Brian worked as a software engineer in a variety of industries and also travelled extensively. Over those years he became increasingly aware of the impact technology was having on the world, and in 2006 he decided to return to university to pursue a degree in the still evolving field of sustainability. Although his studies spanned both the social and natural sciences, his doctoral research focused primarily on developing computer models of the environmental and human health impacts of air pollution from transportation sources and helping decision makers use these models to reduce the adverse impacts. At Aquatic Informatics Brian is drawing on his knowledge and experience to develop cutting edge environmental informatics software that will help make technology part of the sustainability solution.

Water monitoring, Hydrology, Water data management software, Rating curve, Stage discharge curve

Monitoring Needed as “Science” Endorses the Keystone XL Pipeline

In a bold move, Marcia McNutt, the Editor-in-Chief of Science Magazine, one of the world’s top scientific journals, endorsed the Keystone XL pipeline late February1. The controversial pipeline, designed to transport heavy crude from Canada’s oil sands to US Gulf coast refiners, has been mired in controversy over its potential ecological and climate impacts. McNutt,…

Water monitoring, Hydrology, Water data management software, Rating curve, Stage discharge curve

Soothing a Sting to the Integrity of Science

Scientific knowledge shapes many of our collective beliefs and decisions, but what of its integrity? It’s a question that’s receiving increasing attention, most recently because of a strategically orchestrated sting operation by Science Magazine’s John Bohannon involving the submission of intentionally flawed papers to over 300 open-access journals 1.  It revealed a less than pretty…